In order to get the MOST out of dance class, (and your time and money,) you need to be fully present and apply yourself.

Just as you don’t get buff after 10 pushups, progress happens gradually, over time, with consistent effort.

In this video, our protagonist uses her trusty notes on “How To Make The Most Out Of Dance Class” her class experience is purposeful and fulfilling.

See Original Article: How To Make The Most Out Of Taking Dance Classes

Watch the video and read a those tips to get the most out of dance class!

Get the most out of dance class:

1. Relax. Take a deep breath and don’t overthink.

The studio is like sanctuary for your soul. It’s where you should feel the most free and relaxed!

But we get so caught up in how we look or getting the choreo perfectly it can inhibit us from fully applying ourselves.

No matter how driven you are, always keep in mind that dance is fun!

If you love something, you will get better at it naturally.

 

2. Use your ears and eyes while learning in dance class

Sounds so simple, but LISTEN to the music (without dancing!) and WATCH the choreographer do the piece.

Most instructors are really good at explaining movements, but execution is something that’s near impossible to put into words.

I can try and describe how my momma’s homemade apple pie tastes but you ain’t tasted it yourself!

If you want to SEE and HEAR what the choreographer is trying to teach, WATCH and LISTEN!

 

3. Drill combos during downtime

Don’t limit your learning experience to the times the choreographer is instructing.

You can put in a little extra effort to drill things you messed up, or ask questions during water breaks, practice your facials in the bathroom, or ask the dancer next to you to review together.

You can definitely squeeze in whatever you need to make the class feel whole.

4. Watch groups and learn off of other students

A class experience so special because you can be inspired by everyone around you!

Dance was, and is, a social hobby.

It started off in circles and conga lines and interacting with each other.

Sure, class is geared mostly for individual growth, but “groups” is a time when you can really exchange energies with other dancers in the room.

Take advantage of that time and watch, cheer ’em on, and be watched and cheered on.

 

5. Don’t be afraid to take center during groups

When you go up to do the piece, you’re not just moving through the choreography.

You’re performing.

As mentioned above, groups are a time to share.

Don’t just regurgitate the moves that the rest of the class learned together.

Exude confidence. Be in the front line. Go up for the “5 Brave Souls” volunteer group. Let the camera capture you.

 

6. Ask the choreographer for tips

Choreographers want to see you learn and grow from their class.

So if you have a moment to speak with them afterwards, ask them for tips.

Sometimes they will admit that they couldn’t watch you. (In which case, I’ve actually requested for teachers to watch me for notes in specific classes).

But sometimes they will notice certain aspects you can improve on and offer some constructive criticism.

 

7. Practice at home

Just because the class is over doesn’t mean you stop training.

Treat each piece you learn as homework and really pick it apart to understand the movements.

If the videos are posted, review to see if there are any details you missed.

Also, experiment with different executions you otherwise wouldn’t in class.

Maybe try the entire piece softer or try to really hit certain parts harder.

Listen to the song over to see if you hear anything differently, and match your movements to what you uniquely hear.

 

 

You can also take classes on STEEZY Studio, including the piece Charles showcased in this video!

Maybe you don’t have the luxury of driving to a studio every week, or you find that most classes are too fast-paced for you.

Whatever the case, it never hurts to be proactive in becoming a better dancer. Try STEEZY Studio today – for free! 

 

What are some things you practice while taking class to get the most out of the experience? Comment below to share with us! 

This article was originally published on September 15, 2015.